Frozen

Ok, so, we may be a bit late in reviewing this film, but here it goes. Walt Disney Animation studios latest animated adventure follows two sisters, “the film tells the story of a fearless princess who sets off on an epic journey alongside a rugged, thrill-seeking mountain man, his loyal pet reindeer, and a hapless snowman to find her estranged sister, whose icy powers have trapped the kingdom in eternal winter”.

There are some fine performances from the cast, Kristen Bell leads the cast as the fearless, yet clumsy Anna, who’s journey to find her sister is an emotional ride. With the help of Olaf the snowman and Sven the reindeer (perhaps the best thing about this film), the jokes these two characters bring to this otherwise harrowing story about loneliness, siblings, loss of their parents. Elevates this film from just another Disney film.

Chrisophe Beck’s score, along with the clever songs, really make this more than a Disney film. His music enables empathy for both sisters, along with the love and confusion between Anna and Kristoff.

A tour de force and something for everyone to enjoy.

Naomi Jeffreys, The Rabbit and Reel

Hattie Morahan: The Bletchley Circle’s New Girl

“This year has been exciting, rewarding and changing.  A Doll’s House has genuinely changed things for me, it’s been a mad year, it’s been lovely, playing Nora has now become so familiar, each rehearsal period we’ve come back to has been like getting back in to an old coat and it’s like ‘oh yes I remember this’, she’s a really interesting character to play and I really enjoy her contradictions and the strange journey she goes on and so to get to have another crack at it, it’s so complex and the play is so multi layered and so rich that it it’s just a really lovely opportunity to play Nora again”

Hattie Morahan has had an exciting year, since our last interview she has won the Evening Standard Award for Best Actress a Critics Circle Award as well as an Olivier Nomination, all due to her performance as Nora in Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House¸ which had two successful runs at the Young Vic and is now playing at the Duke of York’s Theatre in the West End.  I meet her in her dressing room, which is scattered with copies of Ibsen and she is dressed in jeans, a striped top and her hair is tied up.

I wonder what her awards mean to her and if they have helped her career, “that’s never been the goal of what one does, it’s quite daunting to take on a part which is known and people have opinions about, it’s reassuring to know that the consensus was I didn’t screw it up,” she laughs “I don’t consider it to be totally objective, I’m aware that it’s a part that draws attention to itself and it’s a part that has history. I think the Critics Circle I was particularly proud of, as these are people who really know their stuff and have been in the game for many years between them” she smiles.

The English Touring Company recently revealed a nationwide search to find the Nation’s favourite play written in the English language, I ask what her favourite play would be, “Oh gosh I’d say Shakespeare, As You Like It

Morahan is also set to appear as one of the main cast in the second series of The Bletchley Circle, I wonder if she could tell me a little bit about the show and her role in it, “There’s a group of women who worked at Bletchley Park during the War, they signed the official secrets act so all of their work helping the government break codes means they can’t tell anyone.  It’s now 1950s austerity Britain; there aren’t opportunities for bright women to find something that’s rewarding to their capabilities. So they start solving crimes, in the true tradition of ITV Dramas.”

“I play a character  who was in Bletchley Park and who has various secrets in her past, so she’s a guest in the first two episodes and she’s in prison for a crime, a serious crime and we don’t know what it is, and shes very enigmatic, and doesn’t give much away. Then she later becomes one of the group and I would say she has a lateral brain, lateral thinking, very logical, likes system and machines and shes a sort of geek.” She smiles.

” She was great fun to play and has very strong feelings and feels passionately about the people who are important to her. Shes not very gregarious, but shes intelligent in her own way, shes lovely to play, shes called Alice. I really love playing her.”

Clearly it’s been a successful year for Morahan, coupled with television appearances, leading an award winning show in the West End, she also has time to pursue projects on the side and she recently did a reading at the National Portrait Gallery of the memoirs of artist Laura Knight whom she portrayed in A Summer in February “there’s been this lovely exhibition there and there was this fortuitous coming to together of passions where I was really pleased to read her memoirs”

The Bletchley Circle series two starts on Monday 9pm on ITV1

Naomi Jeffreys, The Rabbit and Reel

The Bling Ring

****

“Because we are all the Bling Ring. We are Alexis Neiers, as scary as that is, we are.”

Nancy Jo Sales, writer and journalist, whose article in Vanity Fair, The Suspect Wore Louboutins was the basis of director Sofia Coppola’s new movie, The Bling Ring. 

The movie is based upon real life events, two teens, namely Rachel Lee and Nick Prugo, robbed Paris Hilton, Audrina Patridge, Rachel Bilson, Orlando Bloom and Lindsay Lohan’s houses, in October 2008. “The Bling Ring” as the group of rich young teens would soon be coined by the media, reportedly stole over $3 million in cash and cars over the course of a year.

Coppola’s movie goes behind the facts and figures and sucks you in to the tiny bubble world, that is Hollywood. She has changed the names, but the story remains the same. The movie is full of common slangs which we are so used to today, “We’re in L.A. Don’t be such a little bitch!”, coupled with that, there is also a laziness to the Ring, the rich teen drawl is en pointe, and realistic, but can unfortunately become a little tiresome after ninety-five minutes.

Emma Watson stars as Nicki Moore, in her third role since the Potter Series ended in 2011. Nicki is insufferable, spoilt, unfeeling and gun toting. Watson proves she is no goody two shoes.

But, it is Katie Chang who plays Rebecca Ahn who steals the movie, quite literally. Her lack of response, lack of feeling and her friendship with Marc Hall (Israel Broussard) which takes this film from a cautionary tale about Capitalism, Celebrity and Temptation, in to a story of two very confused teenagers. Chang, lonely and bored, is drawn to stealing, at first just by checking her rich neighbours cars for money and jewellery, but which soon escaltes in to full on robbery. And Broussard, the new kid, who sees himself as ugly and who was never one of the “cool kids”. For me, it is their friendship which carries the film.

After a while, the movie becomes a challenge cinematically for Coppola, how many times can you show the same characters robbing Celebrities houses? She answers this question creatively and brilliantly, aerial shots, CCTV shots, long scenes where the characters argue over who gets the Louboutins. Reiterating the characters shallow values.  But with a weak ending to a generally informative and enjoyable film, Coppola certainly lives up to her family’s film credentials.

It is hard with true events to determine whether making a movie about it, or writing a book is supporting it, or warning us against it. The same can be said of The Bling Ring, is Coppola warning America that it’s Capitalist and Celebrity Dreams are nothing more than a Nightmare?

That’s for you to decide, biatch.

Naomi Jeffreys, The Rabbit and Reel.

The Bling Ring is out in the UK on Friday 5th July.